Predictors of early in-hospital death after decompressive craniectomy in swollen middle cerebral artery infarction.

Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2017 Feb;159(2):301-306. doi: 10.1007/s00701-016-3049-0. Epub 2016 Dec 10.

Predictors of early in-hospital death after decompressive craniectomy in swollen middle cerebral artery infarction.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Swollen middle cerebral artery infarction is a life-threatening disease and decompressive craniectomy is improving survival significantly. Despite decompressive surgery, however, many patients are not discharged from the hospital alive. We therefore wanted to search for predictors of early in-hospital death after craniectomy in swollen middle cerebral artery infarction.

METHODS:

All patients operated with decompressive craniectomy due to swollen middle cerebral artery infarction at the Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, between May 1998 and October 2010, were included. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed and candidate variables were age, sex, time from stroke onset to decompressive craniectomy, NIHSS on admission, infarction territory, pineal gland displacement, reduction of pineal gland displacement after surgery, and craniectomy size.

RESULTS:

Fourteen out of 45 patients (31%) died during the primary hospitalization (range, 3-44 days). In the multivariate logistic regression model, middle cerebral artery infarction with additional anterior and/or posterior cerebral artery territory involvement was found as the only significant predictor of early in-hospital death (OR, 12.7; 95% CI, 0.01-0.77; p = 0.029).

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study identified additional territory infarction as a significant predictor of early in-hospital death. The relatively small sample size precludes firm conclusions.

KEYWORDS:

Decompressive craniectomy; Middle cerebral artery infarction; Outcome; Predictors; Swollen

PMID:
27942881
DOI:
10.1007/s00701-016-3049-0


Categories: Brain Trauma and NeuroCritical Care, Vascular

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